Between a Rock and a Locus

Who knew awards season could be so much fun?!

The Djinn Falls in Love is a finalist for both the Locus Awards (Best Anthology) and the Shirley Jackson Awards (Best Edited Anthology).

We're very proud to see Djinn contributors Nnedi Okorafor and JY Yang recognised elsewhere on the Locus shortlist - as well as long-time Jurassic London artist Jeffrey Alan Love.

Two Jurassic titles - The Book of the Dead and Robert Sharp's The Good Shabti (illustrated by Love) - have been finalists for the Shirley Jackson Awards in previous years. The prize's penchant for quirky, literary, cross-genre selections makes it one of our very favourites. That, and they give all the finalists a stone, in tribute to the author after which it named. Best trophy in literature.

Very best wishes to all the finalists - we're very pleased to be among you!


Praise from Caesar...

The Djinn Falls in LoveKind words for The Djinn Falls in Love in 2017 round-ups from anthologists Gardner Dozois, Rich Horton and Jonathan Strahan.

The legendary Dozois notes:

One of the most acclaimed [anthologies] was The Djinn Falls in Love and Other Stories, edited by Mahvesh Murad & Jared Shurin, which featured strong work by Helene Wecker, K.J. Parker, E.J. Swift, Nnedi Okorafor, Catherine King, JY Yang, Maria Dahvana Head­ley, and others. 

Strahan puts Djinn in fine company, alongside Dozois himself:

The two best anthologies of the year, often the easiest places to find new fiction, were veteran Gardner Dozois’s epic swords and sorcery anthology, The Book of Swords,... and Mahvesh Murad & Jared Shurin’s The Djinn Falls in Love, a cornucopia of djinn stories from Saad Z. Hossein, Amal El-Mohtar, K.J. Parker, and others.

Rich Horton also mentions Djinn as one of the year's best original anthologies.

We're also delighted by this piece in Dawn by Maniza Naqvi on the state of Pakistani English-language fiction, which begins with great praise:

Irrefutable evidence that possession, and being possessed, is the current state of Pakistani English literature can be found in The Djinn Falls in Love, a captivating collection of short stories edited by Mahvesh Murad and Jared Shurin. Included in this collection are spellbinding and riveting stories by contemporary writers of Pakistani origin such as Sami Shah and Usman T Malik. Transformative? Yes.

Naqvi goes on to mention folks like Mohsin Hamid and Kamila Shamsie (the latter is also in Djinn, of course!), so we're in very, very fine company indeed.

Djinn is very much for sale here.

 


"We did so many things wrong"

We did so many things wrong.

In the introduction, 600-odd pages ago, Anne mentioned that we launched our first anthology, Stories of the Apocalypse without, well… the book. A dozen authors, another dozen family members, a double-handful of supportive friends and a couple befuddled strangers all gathered at Tate Britain to awkwardly scan some QR codes and listen to vague promises of future delivery. We sold three ebooks that day. Not exactly the glorious march into literary history that we had envisioned.

Continue reading ""We did so many things wrong" " »


Another shot at Victory Year

Alexis Kennedy is founder of Failbetter Games, narrative genius behind Fallen London and Sunless Sea, guest writer on Dragon Age, etc etc. He's also the writer of "Victory Year", a short story of alternate history Queen Victoria(s), first (and only) published in Stories of the Smoke.

Smoke is now pretty much impossible to find, but, if Kennedy's new kickstarter - for the tantilising Cultist Simulator - passes its stretch reward, he'll be sharing the story around.

The project is already 200% funded and the reward is close. Plus, the game looks terrific. So for a peek at a long lost story, and a chance to play cultist, check it out.

 


The Mammoth Book of the Mummy

51PwvFAI2jL._SX321_BO1 204 203 200_Paula Guran's The Mammoth Book of the Mummy is a terrific collection of mummy stories, out now from Robinson (UK) and Prime (USA).

The anthology includes several stories that will be familiar to readers of The Book of the Dead (or, better yet, a chance for readers to get their paws on those stories now that The Book of the Dead is out of print). These include:

  • Gail Carriger's "The Curious Case of the Werewolf that Wasn't, The Mummy that Was and the Cat in the Jar"
  • Paul Cornell's "Ramesses on the Frontier"
  • Will Hill's "Three Memories of Death"
  • Adam Robert's "Tollund"

It also contains the complete text of Robert Sharp's The Good Shabti.

There's a lovely shout out to The Book of the Dead, Unearthed and John J. Johnston's terrific work in the introduction. Plus a dozen other stories of mummies and the walking dead by Karen Joy Fowler, Joe Lansdale and many others.


Tales of New Mexico

Tales-of-New-Mexico-Cover-400Joseph D'Lacey's two stories of Pandemonium - "The Gathering of Sheaves" and "The Vespertine" - are coming this July as part of a new collection from the authorTales of New Mexico.

Keen-eyed fans of our shared universe will remember "The Gathering of Sheaves" from A Town Called Pandemonium.

"The Vespertine" was written for the (appropriately) ill-fated Streets of Pandemonium, the sequel that, sadly, never come to pass. 

"Pandatown" is out of print, and Streets was never in print, so this is a great opportunity to pounce on a pair of terrific and horrifying Western-inflected tales.

More on the collection via the author's site.

 


The Djinn Falls in Love - Out Now!

The Djinn Falls in LoveImagine a world filled with fierce, fiery beings, hiding in our shadows, in our dreams, under our skins. Eavesdropping and exploring; savaging our bodies, saving our souls. They are monsters, saviours, victims, childhood friends.

These are the Djinn. And they are everywhere. On street corners, behind the wheel of a taxi, in the chorus, between the pages of books. Every language has a word for them. Every culture knows their traditions. Every religion, every history has them hiding in their dark places. There is no part of the world that does not know them.

They are the Djinn. They are among us.

---

The Djinn Falls in Love is out now! Over twenty amazing and new stories of djinn, from a global cast of talented writers.

Contributors include: Amal El-Mohtar, Catherine King, Claire North, E.J. Swift, Helene Wecker, Hermes (trans. Robin Moger), Jamal Mahjoub, James Smythe, J.Y. Yang, Kamila Shamsie, Kirsty Logan, K.J. Parker, Kuzhali Manickavel, Maria Dahvana Headley, Monica Byrne, Neil Gaiman, Nnedi Okorafor, Saad Hossain, Sami Shah, Sophia Al-Maria and Usman Malik.

You can order copies on Amazon, Amazon.co.uk, Waterstones, Barnes & Noble,Blackwell's and pretty much anywhere else. 

The reviews are very nice, including:

"A treasure chest of literally wonderful and marvelous stories, with a kind of richness that fantasy only rarely achieves." - Tim Powers

"Opens quietly with an intense, thrumming poem from Egyptian poet Hermes, and then ignites like the creature it profiles... a rich and illuminating cultural experience." - Washington Post

"Gorgeous." - Tor.com

"The Djinn Falls in Love is extraordinary." - Jenni Fagan

"It's rare to find an anthology spanning both the globe and realms beyond" - The List

"A sparkling array of talent and imagination" - SFX

"A superb collection of superior stories by some of my favorite writers. This is the must-have anthology of the year." - Lavie Tidhar

More here.

Mahvesh and I have been working on Djinn for a long time now, and we're delighted that it is finally reaching readers. We hope you enjoy reading it as much as we did putting it together.


"Murphy's Variations" by Mazin Saleem

Murphy's VariationsTabulit is a terrific new platform for independent creators, focused on publishing exciting new comics and novels online.

We're pleased to announce "Murphy's Variations", a brand new, and very twisty, serial from Mazin Saleem:

Kon grinds out the hours at his soulless office job, and his personal life isn't much better: he can't understand his friend's pop cultural references, and his girlfriend seems to be on another wavelength entirely. Everything he does seems to alienate people; everything he sees just raises more questions. Kon throws himself into the massive task of fitting in. One question leads to another; one world leads to another; until Kon is faced with the biggest question of all. Does Eddie Murphy even exist?

"Murphy's Variations" is a wonderfully tricksy, world-hopping bit of science-fictional magical realism (that's not a genre, but should be). The universe - or universes - are connected in more ways that we know, and a certain Hollywood star seems to be at the centre of it all.

Mazin's fiction has appeared in Litro Magazine, The Literateur, and The Open Pen Anthology, and his non-fiction at Pornokitsch, Little Atoms, and Big Other

Check it out.